JMIR Mental Health

Internet interventions, technologies, and digital innovations for mental health and behavior change.

Editor-in-Chief:

John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA


Impact Factor 4.39

JMIR Mental Health (JMH, ISSN 2368-7959, Editor-in-Chief: John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA, Impact Factor: 4.39) is a premier SCIE/PubMed/Scopus-indexed, peer-reviewed journal with a unique focus on digital health/digital psychiatry/digital psychology/e-mental health, covering Internet/mobile interventions, technologies and electronic innovations (software and hardware) for mental health, including addictions, online counselling and behaviour change. This includes formative evaluation and system descriptions, theoretical papers, review papers, viewpoint/vision papers, and rigorous evaluations related to digital psychiatry, e-mental health, and clinical informatics in psychiatry/psychology. In June 2021, JMH received a substantially increased impact factor of 4.39. 

The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

JMIR Mental Health has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

JMIR Mental Health features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

The journal is indexed in PubMed, PubMed CentralSCIE (Science Citation Index Expanded)/WoS/JCR (Journal Citation Reports), EMBASE, and Scopus. JMH has also been accepted for indexing in PsycINFO.

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Depression and Mood Disorders; Suicide Prevention

Little is known about the internet search activity of people with suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs). This data source has the potential to inform both clinical and public health efforts, such as suicide risk assessment and prevention.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews in Digital Mental Health

A growing body of literature has detailed the use of qualitative analyses to measure the therapeutic processes and intrinsic effectiveness of psychotherapies, which yield small databases. Nonetheless, these approaches have several limitations and machine learning algorithms are needed.

|
Article Thumbnail
Innovations in Mental Health Systems

Secondary schools are increasingly supporting adolescents’ mental health and well-being, yet many teachers report that they lack the skills and confidence to do so. Building Educators’ skills in Adolescent Mental Health (BEAM) is a web-based training program developed to improve secondary school teachers’ knowledge and confidence in caring for students’ mental health.

|
Article Thumbnail
Depression and Mood Disorders; Suicide Prevention

Depression and anxiety are leading causes of disability worldwide, but access to quality mental health care is limited by myriad factors. Cognitive-behavioral coaching is rooted in evidence-based principles and has the potential to address some of these unmet care needs. Harnessing technology to facilitate broader dissemination within a blended care model shows additional promise for overcoming barriers to care.

|
Article Thumbnail
Psychotic Disorders

Gangstalking refers to a novel persecutory belief system wherein sufferers believe that they are being followed, watched, and harassed by a vast network of people in their community who have been recruited as complicit perpetrators. They are frequently diagnosed as mentally ill, although they reject this formulation. Those affected by this belief system self-identify as targeted individuals (TIs). They seek to prove the veracity of their persecution and dispute the notion that they are mentally ill by posting videos online that purport to provide evidence of their claims.

|
Article Thumbnail
Bipolar Disorders

Web-based resources can support people with bipolar disorder (BD) to improve their knowledge and self-management. However, publicly available resources are heterogeneous in terms of their quality and ease of use. Characterizing digital health literacy (the skillset that enable people to navigate and make use of health information in a web-based context) in BD will support the development of educational resources.

|
Article Thumbnail
Depression and Mood Disorders; Suicide Prevention

e-Mental health apps targeting depression have gained increased attention in mental health care. Daily self-assessment is an essential part of e-mental health apps. The Self-administered Psycho-TherApy-SystemS (SELFPASS) app is a self-management app to manage depressive and comorbid anxiety symptoms of patients with a depression diagnosis. A self-developed item pool with 40 depression items and 12 anxiety items is included to provide symptom-specific suggestions for interventions. However, the psychometric properties of the item pool have not yet been evaluated.

|
Article Thumbnail
Methods and New Tools in Mental Health Research

Concerns abound regarding childhood smartphone use, but studies to date have largely relied on self-reported screen use. Self-reporting of screen use is known to be misreported by pediatric samples and their parents, limiting the accurate determination of the impact of screen use on social, emotional, and cognitive development. Thus, a more passive, objective measurement of smartphone screen use among children is needed.

|
Article Thumbnail
Telepsychiatry

Telepsychology is increasingly being incorporated in clinical practice, being offered in many psychotherapy centers, especially after the impact of the pandemic. However, there seems to be a remarkable discrepancy between the offer, or interest in, and real-world uptake of e-mental health interventions among the population. A critical precondition is clients’ willingness to accept and use telepsychology, although this issue has thus far been overlooked in research.

|
Article Thumbnail
Substance Abuse

Opioid use disorder (OUD) is characterized by the inability to control opioid use despite attempts to stop use and negative consequences to oneself and others. The burden of opioid misuse and OUD is a national crisis in the United States with substantial public health, social, and economic implications. Although medication-assisted treatment (MAT) has demonstrated efficacy in the management of OUD, access to effective counseling and psychosocial support is a limiting factor and a significant problem for many patients and physicians. Digital therapeutics are an innovative class of interventions that help prevent, manage, or treat diseases by delivering therapy using software programs. These applications can circumvent barriers to uptake, improve treatment adherence, and enable broad delivery of evidence-based management strategies to meet service gaps. However, few digital therapeutics specifically targeting OUD are available, and additional options are needed.

|
Article Thumbnail
Users' and Patients' Needs for Mental Health Services

Behavioral mitigation strategies to slow the spread of COVID-19 have resulted in sweeping lifestyle changes, with short- and long-term psychological, well-being, and quality of life implications. The Attitudes About COVID-19 and Health (ATTACH) study focuses on understanding attitudes and beliefs while considering the impact on mental and physical health and the influence of broader demographic and geographic factors on attitudes, beliefs, and mental health burden.

|

We are working in partnership with