JMIR Mental Health

Internet interventions, technologies, and digital innovations for mental health and behavior change.

JMIR Mental Health is the official journal of the Society of Digital Psychiatry

Editor-in-Chief:

John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA


Impact Factor 5.2

JMIR Mental Health (JMH, ISSN 2368-7959, Editor-in-Chief: John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA, Impact Factor: 5.2) is a premier PubMed/PubMed CentralMEDLINESCIE (Science Citation Index Expanded)/WoS/JCR (Journal Citation Reports), EMBASE, Sherpa/Romeo, DOAJ, PsycINFO, ESCI, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials and Scopus indexed, peer-reviewed journal with a unique focus on digital health/digital psychiatry/digital psychology/e-mental health, covering Internet/mobile interventions, technologies and electronic innovations (software and hardware) for mental health, including addictions, online counselling and behaviour change. This includes formative evaluation and system descriptions, theoretical papers, review papers, viewpoint/vision papers, and rigorous evaluations related to digital psychiatry, e-mental health, and clinical informatics in psychiatry/psychology. In June 2023, JMH received an impact factor of 5.2

The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

JMIR Mental Health has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

JMIR Mental Health features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Anxiety and Stress Disorders

The utility of brief mindfulness ecological momentary interventions (EMIs) to improve empathy and theory-of-mind has been underinvestigated, particularly in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

|
Article Thumbnail
Theme Issue 2023 : Responsible Design, Integration, and Use of Generative AI in Mental Health

This article explores a significant shift in the field of mental health in general and psychotherapy in particular, following generative artificial intelligence's new capabilities in processing and generating human-like language. Following Freud, this lingo-technological development is conceptualized as the "fourth narcissistic blow" that science inflicts on humanity. We argue that this narcissistic blow has a potentially dramatic influence on perceptions of human society, inter-relationships, and the self. We should, accordingly, expect dramatic changes in perceptions of the therapeutic act, following the emergence of what we terms the "artificial third" in the field of psychotherapy. The introduction of an "artificial third" marks a critical juncture, prompting us to ask important core questions which address two basic elements of critical thinking, namely, transparency and autonomy: (1) What is this new artificial presence in therapy relationships?; (2) How does it reshape our perception of ourselves and our interpersonal dynamics?; (3) What remains of the irreplaceable human elements at the core of therapy?. Given the ethical implications that arise from these questions, this article proposes that the "artificial third" can be a valuable asset when applied with insight and ethical consideration, enhancing but not replacing the human touch in therapy.

|
Article Thumbnail
Clinical Mental Health Informatics

The National Health Service (NHS) Talking Therapies program treats people with common mental health problems in England according to “stepped care,” in which lower-intensity interventions are offered in the first instance, where clinically appropriate. Limited resources and pressure to achieve service standards mean that program providers are exploring all opportunities to evaluate and improve the flow of patients through their service. Existing research has found variation in clinical performance and stepped care implementation across sites and has identified associations between service delivery and patient outcomes. Process mining offers a data-driven approach to analyzing and evaluating health care processes and systems, enabling comparison of presumed models of service delivery and their actual implementation in practice. The value and utility of applying process mining to NHS Talking Therapies data for the analysis of care pathways have not been studied.

|
Article Thumbnail
Innovations in Mental Health Systems

Compromised well-being and mental health problems pose a significant threat to individuals and societies worldwide. Resource-intensive psychological treatments alone cannot alleviate this burden. There is a need for low-cost, evidence-based interventions aimed at preventing illness and promoting well-being. Five activity domains appear to be linked with well-being promotion across populations: connecting with others, being active, taking notice, learning, and being generous/giving. The activities mentioned are part of the Five Ways to Wellbeing framework and the web-based intervention Five Ways to Wellbeing for All (5waysA).

|
Article Thumbnail
Depression and Mood Disorders; Suicide Prevention

Rates of suicide have increased over 35 percent since 1999. Despite concerted efforts, our ability to predict, explain, or treat suicide risk has not improved over the past fifty years.

|
Article Thumbnail
Methods and New Tools in Mental Health Research

The care environment significantly influences the experiences of patients with severe mental illness and the quality of their care. While a welcoming and stimulating environment enhances patient satisfaction and health outcomes, psychiatric facilities often prioritize staff workflow over patient needs. Addressing these challenges is crucial to improving patient experiences and outcomes in mental health care.

|
Article Thumbnail
Clinical Mental Health Informatics

Mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders are chronic pediatric conditions, and their prevalence has been on the rise over recent decades. Affected children have long-term health sequelae and a decline in health-related quality of life. Due to the lack of a validated database for pharmacoepidemiological research on selected mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders, there is uncertainty in the reported prevalence in the literature.

|
Article Thumbnail
Mobile Health in Psychiatry

Mental health conditions are highly prevalent among US veterans. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is committed to enhancing mental health care through the integration of measurement-based care (MBC) practices, guided by its Collect-Share-Act model. Incorporating the use of remote mobile apps may further support the implementation of MBC for mental health care.

|
Article Thumbnail
Depression and Mood Disorders; Suicide Prevention

The Feeling Good App is an automated stand-alone digital mobile mental health tool currently undergoing beta testing with the goal of providing evidence-informed self-help lessons and exercises to help individuals reduce depressive symptoms without guidance from a mental health provider. Users work through intensive basic training (IBT) and ongoing training models that provide education regarding cognitive behavioral therapy principles from a smartphone.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews in Digital Mental Health

Online forums are widely used for mental health peer support. However, evidence of their safety and effectiveness is mixed. Further research focused on articulating the contexts in which positive and negative impacts emerge from forum use is required to inform innovations in implementation.

|
Article Thumbnail
Depression and Mood Disorders; Suicide Prevention

There is growing concern around the use of sodium nitrite (SN) as an emerging means of suicide, particularly among younger people. Given limited information on the topic from traditional public health surveillance sources, we studied posts made to a suicide discussion online forum, ‘Sanctioned Suicide’, a primary source of information on use and procurement of SN.

|

We are working in partnership with