JMIR Mental Health

Internet interventions, technologies, and digital innovations for mental health and behavior change.

Editor-in-Chief:

John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA


Impact Factor 6.33

JMIR Mental Health (JMH, ISSN 2368-7959, Editor-in-Chief: John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA, Impact Factor: 6.33) is a premier SCIE/PubMed/Scopus-indexed, peer-reviewed journal with a unique focus on digital health/digital psychiatry/digital psychology/e-mental health, covering Internet/mobile interventions, technologies and electronic innovations (software and hardware) for mental health, including addictions, online counselling and behaviour change. This includes formative evaluation and system descriptions, theoretical papers, review papers, viewpoint/vision papers, and rigorous evaluations related to digital psychiatry, e-mental health, and clinical informatics in psychiatry/psychology. In June 2022, JMH received a substantially increased impact factor of 6.33. 

The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

JMIR Mental Health has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

JMIR Mental Health features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

The journal is indexed in PubMed, PubMed CentralSCIE (Science Citation Index Expanded)/WoS/JCR (Journal Citation Reports), EMBASE, and Scopus. JMH has also been accepted for indexing in PsycINFO.

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Anxiety and Stress Disorders

While mental health applications are increasingly becoming available for large populations of users, there is a lack of controlled trials on the impacts of such applications. Artificial intelligence (AI)-empowered agents have been evaluated when assisting adults with cognitive impairments; however, few applications are available for aging adults who are still actively working. These adults often have high stress levels related to changes in their work places, and related symptoms eventually affect their quality of life.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews in Digital Mental Health

Although there are thousands of mental health apps, 2 apps, Headspace and Calm, claim a large percentage of the marketplace. These two mindfulness and meditation apps have reached tens of millions of active users. To guide consumers, clinicians, and researchers, we performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of Headspace and Calm.

|
Article Thumbnail
Problematic Internet Use, Online Gambling and Game Addiction

Very few people seek in-person treatment for online behavioral addictions including gaming and gambling or problems associated with shopping, pornography use, or social media use. Web-based treatments have the potential to address low rates of help seeking due to their convenience, accessibility, and capacity to address barriers to health care access (eg, shame, stigma, cost, and access to expert care). However, web-based treatments for online behavioral addictions have not been systematically evaluated.

|
Article Thumbnail
Mobile Health in Psychiatry

Mobile health (mHealth) apps offer new opportunities to deliver psychological treatments for mental illness in an accessible, private format. The results of several previous systematic reviews support the use of app-based mHealth interventions for anxiety and depression symptom management. However, it remains unclear how much or how long the minimum treatment “dose” is for an mHealth intervention to be effective. Just-in-time adaptive intervention (JITAI) has been introduced in the mHealth domain to facilitate behavior changes and is positioned to guide the design of mHealth interventions with enhanced adherence and effectiveness.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews in Digital Mental Health

An anticipated surge in mental health service demand related to COVID-19 has motivated the use of novel methods of care to meet demand, given workforce limitations. Digital health technologies in the form of self-tracking technology have been identified as a potential avenue, provided sufficient evidence exists to support their effectiveness in mental health contexts.

|
Article Thumbnail
Telepsychiatry

Patients with limited English proficiency frequently receive substandard health care. Asynchronous telepsychiatry (ATP) has been established as a clinically valid method for psychiatric assessments. The addition of automated speech recognition (ASR) and automated machine translation (AMT) technologies to asynchronous telepsychiatry may be a viable artificial intelligence (AI)–language interpretation option.

|
Article Thumbnail
Anxiety and Stress Disorders

COVID-19 and its public health response are having a profound effect on people’s mental health. To provide support during these times, Canada’s largest mental health and addiction teaching hospital (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health [CAMH]) launched the Mental Health and COVID-19 Pandemic website on March 18, 2020. This website was designed to be a nonstigmatizing psychoeducational resource for people experiencing mild to moderate distress due to COVID-19 and the public health response to the pandemic.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews in Digital Mental Health

Levels of well-being are declining, whereas rates of mental health problems remain high in young people. The World Health Organization defines mental health as not merely the absence of mental disorder but also includes social and psychological well-being as integral to positive mental health, highlighting that mental health is applicable to young people with mental health conditions and those without a diagnosis of a mental health condition. Reduced mental well-being have been identified in studies of young people with clinical populations, as well as in populations consisting of nonclinical young people. Self-help digital interventions can be delivered at mass at a low cost and without the need for trained input, thereby facilitating access to support for well-being. Self-help interventions are effective in young people with mental health conditions, but systematic reviews of such studies have been limited to randomized controlled trials, have not included reduced well-being as an inclusion criterion, and do not consider engagement factors such as retention.

|
Article Thumbnail
JMH Theme Issue: COVID-19 and Mental Health: Impact and Interventions

The COVID-19 pandemic required mental health services around the world to adapt quickly to the new restrictions and regulations put in place to reduce the risk of transmission. As face-to-face contact became difficult, virtual methods were implemented to continue to safely provide mental health care. However, it is unclear to what extent service provision transitioned to telemental health worldwide.

|
Article Thumbnail
Problematic Internet Use, Online Gambling and Game Addiction

Voluntary self-exclusion from gambling is a common harm reduction option for individuals with gambling problems. Multi-operator, nationwide self-exclusion services are rare, and a system introduced in the highly web-based gambling market of Sweden is a rare and recent example. However, where web-based casino gambling and web-based betting are the predominate gambling types in those seeking treatment, the risk of breaching one’s own self-exclusion through overseas web-based operators may also be high.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews in Digital Mental Health

Digital, self-guided cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions circumvent many barriers to in-person therapy for young people (aged 12-24 years), although adherence to these interventions is low. The absence or insufficient disclosure of recommendations or instructions for appropriate use may account for this. As such, many young people may not self-administer these interventions appropriately or receive the optimal degree of treatment.

|

We are working in partnership with