JMIR Mental Health

Internet interventions, technologies, and digital innovations for mental health and behavior change.

Editor-in-Chief:

John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA


Impact Factor 6.33

JMIR Mental Health (JMH, ISSN 2368-7959, Editor-in-Chief: John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA, Impact Factor: 6.33) is a premier SCIE/PubMed/Scopus-indexed, peer-reviewed journal with a unique focus on digital health/digital psychiatry/digital psychology/e-mental health, covering Internet/mobile interventions, technologies and electronic innovations (software and hardware) for mental health, including addictions, online counselling and behaviour change. This includes formative evaluation and system descriptions, theoretical papers, review papers, viewpoint/vision papers, and rigorous evaluations related to digital psychiatry, e-mental health, and clinical informatics in psychiatry/psychology. In June 2022, JMH received a substantially increased impact factor of 6.33. 

The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

JMIR Mental Health has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

JMIR Mental Health features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

The journal is indexed in PubMed, PubMed CentralSCIE (Science Citation Index Expanded)/WoS/JCR (Journal Citation Reports), EMBASE, and Scopus. JMH has also been accepted for indexing in PsycINFO.

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Innovations in Mental Health Systems

The Measurement Based Care in Mental Health Initiative launched by the Department of Veterans Affairs in 2016 is an example of an evidence-based practice that uses patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to improve patient outcomes. The acceptance of measurement-based care (MBC) among Veterans Affairs providers is relatively high. However, there are barriers to MBC for telehealth providers. Health information technologies might afford opportunities to address some of the barriers related to the uptake of MBC.

|
Article Thumbnail
Depression and Mood Disorders; Suicide Prevention

Adolescence is a phase of higher vulnerability for suicidal behavior. In Germany, almost 500 adolescents and young adults aged 15-25 years commit suicide each year. Youths in rural areas are characterized by a higher likelihood of poorer mental health. In rural areas, appropriate support for adolescents and young adults in mental health crises is difficult to access. The general acceptability of digital communication in youths can make the provision of an eHealth tool a promising strategy.

|
Article Thumbnail
Methods and New Tools in Mental Health Research

Identifying momentary risk and protective mechanisms may enhance our understanding and treatment of mental disorders. Affective stress reactivity is one mechanism that has been reported to be altered in individuals with early and later stages of mental disorder. Additionally, initial evidence suggests individuals with early and enduring psychosis may have an extended recovery period of negative affect in response to daily stressors (ie, a longer duration until affect reaches baseline levels after stress), but evidence on positive affective recovery as a putative protective mechanism remains limited.

|
Article Thumbnail
Depression and Mood Disorders; Suicide Prevention

Internet-based interventions (IBIs) are effective for the prevention and treatment of mental disorders and are valuable additions for improving routine care. However, the uptake of and adherence to IBIs are often limited. To increase the actual use of IBIs, it is important to identify factors for engaging with and adhering to IBIs.

|
Article Thumbnail
Mobile Health in Psychiatry

Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have been used extensively in psychosis research. In contrast, their integration into real-world clinical care has been limited despite the broad availability of smartphone-based apps targeting mental health care. Most apps developed for treatment of individuals with psychosis have focused primarily on encouraging self-management skills of patients via practicing cognitive behavioral techniques learned during face-to-face clinical sessions (eg, challenging dysfunctional thoughts and relaxation exercises), reminders to engage in health-promoting activities (eg, exercising, sleeping, and socializing), or symptom monitoring. In contrast, few apps have sought to enhance the clinical encounter itself to improve shared decision-making (SDM) and therapeutic relationships with clinicians, which have been linked to positive clinical outcomes.

|
Article Thumbnail
Viewpoints and Opinions on Mental Health

Recent developments in artificial intelligence technologies have come to a point where machine learning algorithms can infer mental status based on someone’s photos and texts posted on social media. More than that, these algorithms are able to predict, with a reasonable degree of accuracy, future mental illness. They potentially represent an important advance in mental health care for preventive and early diagnosis initiatives, and for aiding professionals in the follow-up and prognosis of their patients. However, important issues call for major caution in the use of such technologies, namely, privacy and the stigma related to mental disorders. In this paper, we discuss the bioethical implications of using such technologies to diagnose and predict future mental illness, given the current scenario of swiftly growing technologies that analyze human language and the online availability of personal information given by social media. We also suggest future directions to be taken to minimize the misuse of such important technologies.

|
Article Thumbnail
Bipolar Disorders

Internet-delivered psychosocial interventions can overcome barriers to face-to-face psychosocial care, but limited evidence supports their cost-effectiveness for people with bipolar disorders (BDs).

|
Article Thumbnail
Transdiagnostic Mental Health Interventions

Transdiagnostic internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for emotional disorders has been shown to be effective in specialized care in the short term. However, less is known about its long-term effects in this specific setting. In addition, predictors of long-term effectiveness may help to identify what treatments are more suitable for certain individuals.

|
Article Thumbnail
Viewpoints and Opinions on Mental Health

The metaverse—a virtual world accessed via virtual reality technology—has been heralded as the next key digital experience. It is meant to provide the next evolution of human interaction after social media and telework. However, in the context of the growing awareness of the risks to mental health posed by current social media technologies, there is a great deal of uncertainty as to the potential effects of this new technology on mental health. This uncertainty is compounded by a lack of clarity regarding what form the metaverse will ultimately take and how widespread its application will be. Despite this, given the nascent state of the metaverse, there is an opportunity to plan the research and regulatory approaches needed to understand it and promote its positive effects while protecting vulnerable groups. In this viewpoint, we examine the following three current technologies whose functions comprise a portion of what the metaverse seeks to accomplish: teleworking, virtual reality, and social media. We attempted to understand in what ways the metaverse may have similar benefits and pitfalls to these technologies but also how it may fundamentally differ from them. These differences suggest potential research questions to be addressed in future work. We found that current technologies have enabled tools such as virtual reality–assisted therapy, avatar therapy, and teletherapy, which have had positive effects on mental health care, and that the metaverse may provide meaningful improvements to these tools. However, given its similarities to social media and its expansion upon the social media experience, the metaverse raises some of the same concerns that we have with social media, such as the possible exacerbation of certain mental health problems. These concerns led us to consider questions such as how the users will be protected and what regulatory mechanisms will be put in place to ensure user safety. Although clear answers to these questions are challenging in this early phase of metaverse research, in this viewpoint, we use the context provided by comparator technologies to provide recommendations to maximize the potential benefits and limit the putative harms of the metaverse. We hope that this paper encourages discussions among researchers and policy makers.

|
Article Thumbnail
Mobile Health in Psychiatry

Cognitive dysfunction is an impairing core symptom of depression. Among adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated with antidepressants, residual cognitive symptoms interfere with patient-reported outcomes. The foregoing characterization of cognitive symptoms provides the rationale for screening and assessing the severity of cognitive symptoms at point of care. However, clinical neurocognitive assessments are time-consuming and difficult, and they require specialist expertise to interpret them. A smartphone-delivered neurocognitive test may offer an effective and accessible tool that can be readily implemented into a measurement-based care framework.

|
Article Thumbnail
Loneliness and Social Isolation

Communication via technology is regarded as an effective way of maintaining social connection and helping individuals to cope with the psychological impact of social distancing measures during a pandemic. However, there is little information about which factors have influenced increased use of technology to communicate with others during lockdowns and whether this has changed over time.

|
Article Thumbnail
Transdiagnostic Mental Health Interventions

Virtual clinical interactions have increased tremendously since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. While they certainly have their advantages, there also exist potential limitations, for example, in establishing a therapeutic alliance, discussing complex clinical scenarios, etc. This may be due to possible disruptions in the accurate activation of the human mirror neuron system (MNS), a posited physiological template for effective social communication.

|

We are working in partnership with