JMIR Mental Health

Internet interventions, technologies, and digital innovations for mental health and behavior change.

JMIR Mental Health is the official journal of the Society of Digital Psychiatry

Editor-in-Chief:

John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA


Impact Factor 5.2

JMIR Mental Health (JMH, ISSN 2368-7959, Editor-in-Chief: John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA, Impact Factor: 5.2) is a premier PubMed/PubMed CentralMEDLINESCIE (Science Citation Index Expanded)/WoS/JCR (Journal Citation Reports), EMBASE, Sherpa/Romeo, DOAJ, PsycINFO, ESCI, EBSCO/EBSCO Essentials and Scopus indexed, peer-reviewed journal with a unique focus on digital health/digital psychiatry/digital psychology/e-mental health, covering Internet/mobile interventions, technologies and electronic innovations (software and hardware) for mental health, including addictions, online counselling and behaviour change. This includes formative evaluation and system descriptions, theoretical papers, review papers, viewpoint/vision papers, and rigorous evaluations related to digital psychiatry, e-mental health, and clinical informatics in psychiatry/psychology. In June 2023, JMH received an impact factor of 5.2

The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

JMIR Mental Health has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

JMIR Mental Health features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

Recent Articles

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Intellectual Disabilities

Responsible digital care refers to any intentional systematic effort designed to increase the likelihood of a digital care technology developed through ethical decision-making, being socially responsible and aligned with the values and well-being of those impacted by it.

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Depression and Mood Disorders; Suicide Prevention

The widespread occurrence and devastating impact of adolescent depression warrant health service research focused on feasible and acceptable digital health tools to supplement evidence-based intervention (EBI) efforts, particularly in the context of shelter-in-place guidelines disrupting youth socialization and service use in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Given the promise of SMS text message interventions to enhance EBI engagement, our team developed the HealthySMS system as an adjunct to one of the most empirically supported interventions for adolescent depression: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group services. The system sends daily SMS text messages requesting responses assessing mood, thoughts, and activities; weekly attendance reminder messages; daily tips about adherence (eg, a prompt for activity completion); and personalized responses based on participants’ texts.

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Depression and Mood Disorders; Suicide Prevention

Depression is a hidden burden, yet it is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Despite the adverse effects of depression, fewer than one-third of patients receive care. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (i-CBT) is an effective treatment for depression, and combining i-CBT with supervised care could make the therapy scalable and effective. A stepped care model is a framework for beginning treatment with an effective and low-intensity intervention while adapting care based on the patient’s needs.

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Virtual Reality Interventions in Mental Health

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a debilitating psychiatric disorder that affects occupational and social functioning. Virtual reality (VR) therapies can provide effective treatment for people with SAD. However, with rapid innovations in immersive VR technology, more contemporary research is required to examine the effectiveness and concomitant user experience outcomes (ie, safety, usability, acceptability, and attrition) of emerging VR interventions for SAD.

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Theme Issue 2023 : Responsible Design, Integration, and Use of Generative AI in Mental Health

Mentalization, which is integral to human cognitive processes, pertains to the interpretation of one’s own and others’ mental states, including emotions, beliefs, and intentions. With the advent of artificial intelligence (AI) and the prominence of large language models in mental health applications, questions persist about their aptitude in emotional comprehension. The prior iteration of the large language model from OpenAI, ChatGPT-3.5, demonstrated an advanced capacity to interpret emotions from textual data, surpassing human benchmarks. Given the introduction of ChatGPT-4, with its enhanced visual processing capabilities, and considering Google Bard’s existing visual functionalities, a rigorous assessment of their proficiency in visual mentalizing is warranted.

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Innovations in Mental Health Systems

Over the past few years, online record access (ORA) has been established through secure patient portals in various countries, allowing patients to access their health data, including clinical notes (“open notes”). Previous research indicates that ORA in mental health, particularly among patients with severe mental illness (SMI), has been rarely offered. Little is known about the expectations and motivations of patients with SMI when reading what their clinicians share via ORA.

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Reviews in Digital Mental Health

The prevalence of mental illness increased in children, adolescents, and young adults during the COVID-19 pandemic, while at the same time, access to treatment facilities has been restricted, resulting in a need for the quick implementation of remote or online interventions.

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Methods and New Tools in Mental Health Research

Technology-based mental health interventions address barriers rural veterans face in accessing care, including provider scarcity and distance from the hospital or clinic. webSTAIR is a 10-module, web-based treatment based on Skills Training in Affective and Interpersonal Regulation, designed to treat posttraumatic stress disorder and depression in individuals exposed to trauma. Previous work has demonstrated that webSTAIR is acceptable to participants and effective at reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression when delivered synchronously or asynchronously (over 5 or 10 sessions).

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Users' and Patients' Needs for Mental Health Services

Sharing mental health notes through patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) is controversial. Many psychiatric organizations and regions in Sweden have resisted the implementation, as clinicians worry about possible harms when patients are reading their notes. Despite the documented benefits of PAEHRs, there is still a lack of knowledge regarding whether patients with mental health issues could reap similar benefits of reading their notes as other patient groups.

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Virtual Reality Interventions in Mental Health

Empirical evidence has shown that virtual reality (VR) scenarios can increase the effects of relaxation techniques, reducing anxiety by enabling people to experience emotional conditions in more vivid settings.

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Methods and New Tools in Mental Health Research

Health care providers and health-related researchers face significant challenges when applying sentiment analysis tools to health-related free-text survey data. Most state-of-the-art applications were developed in domains such as social media, and their performance in the health care context remains relatively unknown. Moreover, existing studies indicate that these tools often lack accuracy and produce inconsistent results.

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Reviews in Digital Mental Health

Mental health difficulties are highly prevalent worldwide. Passive sensing technologies and applied artificial intelligence (AI) methods can provide an innovative means of supporting the management of mental health problems and enhancing the quality of care. However, the views of stakeholders are important in understanding the potential barriers to and facilitators of their implementation.

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