JMIR Mental Health

Internet interventions, technologies, and digital innovations for mental health and behavior change.

Editor-in-Chief:

John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA


Impact Factor 6.33

JMIR Mental Health (JMH, ISSN 2368-7959, Editor-in-Chief: John Torous, MD, MBI, Harvard Medical School, USA, Impact Factor: 6.33) is a premier SCIE/PubMed/Scopus-indexed, peer-reviewed journal with a unique focus on digital health/digital psychiatry/digital psychology/e-mental health, covering Internet/mobile interventions, technologies and electronic innovations (software and hardware) for mental health, including addictions, online counselling and behaviour change. This includes formative evaluation and system descriptions, theoretical papers, review papers, viewpoint/vision papers, and rigorous evaluations related to digital psychiatry, e-mental health, and clinical informatics in psychiatry/psychology. In June 2022, JMH received a substantially increased impact factor of 6.33. 

The main themes/topics covered by this journal can be found here.

JMIR Mental Health has an international author- and readership and welcomes submissions from around the world.

JMIR Mental Health features a rapid and thorough peer-review process, professional copyediting, professional production of PDF, XHTML, and XML proofs.

The journal is indexed in PubMed, PubMed CentralSCIE (Science Citation Index Expanded)/WoS/JCR (Journal Citation Reports), EMBASE, and Scopus. JMH has also been accepted for indexing in PsycINFO.

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Mobile Health in Psychiatry

Brief interventions such as mental health apps and single-session interventions are increasingly popular, efficacious, and accessible delivery formats that may be beneficial for college students whose mental health needs may not be adequately met by college counseling centers. However, no studies so far have examined the effectiveness of these modes of treatment for college students who are already receiving traditional therapy, despite it being common among this population.

|
Article Thumbnail
JMH Theme Issue: COVID-19 and Mental Health: Impact and Interventions

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Czech population experienced a second lockdown lasting for about half a year, restricting free movement and imposing social isolation. However, it is not known whether the impact of this long lockdown resulted in habituation to the adverse situation or in the traumatization of the Czech population, and whether the media and specific media use contributed to these effects.

|
Article Thumbnail
Methods and New Tools in Mental Health Research

The role of working alliance remains unclear for many forms of internet-based interventions (IBIs), a set of effective psychotherapy alternatives that do not require synchronous interactions between patients and therapists.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews in Digital Mental Health

Digital mental health interventions have a great potential to alleviate mental illness and increase access to care. However, these technologies face significant challenges, especially in terms of user engagement and adoption. It has been suggested that this issue stems from a lack of user perspective in the development process; accordingly, several human-centered design approaches have been developed over the years to consider this important aspect. Yet, few human-centered design approaches to digital solutions exist in the field of mental health, and rarely are end users involved in their development.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews in Digital Mental Health

The COVID-19 pandemic has shifted mental health care delivery to digital platforms, videoconferencing, and other mobile communications. However, existing reviews of digital health interventions are narrow in scope and focus on a limited number of mental health conditions.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews in Digital Mental Health

Web-based interventions have proven to be effective not only in clinical populations but also in the occupational setting. Recent studies conducted in the work environment have focused on the effectiveness of these interventions. However, the role of employees’ acceptability of web-based interventions and programs has not yet enjoyed a similar level of attention.

|
Article Thumbnail
Users' and Patients' Needs for Mental Health Services

There is currently an increased interest in and acceptance of technology-enabled mental health care. To adequately harness this opportunity, it is critical that the design and development of digital mental health technologies be informed by the needs and preferences of end users. Despite young people and clinicians being the predominant users of such technologies, few studies have examined their perspectives on different digital mental health technologies.

|
Article Thumbnail
Behavior Change

Self-regulation refers to a person’s ability to manage their cognitive, emotional, and behavioral processes to achieve long-term goals. Most prior research has examined self-regulation at the individual level; however, individual-level assessments do not allow the examination of dynamic patterns of intraindividual variability in self-regulation and thus cannot aid in understanding potential malleable processes of self-regulation that may occur in response to the daily environment.

|
Article Thumbnail
Innovations in Mental Health Systems

Internet interventions for mental disorders and psychological problems such as prolonged grief have established their efficacy. However, little is known about how internet interventions work and the mechanisms through which they are linked to the outcomes.

|
Article Thumbnail
Virtual Reality Interventions in Mental Health

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a global crisis with increasing incidence and prevalence. There are many established evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) for depression, but numerous barriers still exist; most notably, access and dissemination. Virtual reality (VR) may offer some solutions to existing constraints of EBPs for MDD.

|

Preprints Open for Peer-Review

We are working in partnership with