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User Experience of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Apps for Depression: An Analysis of App Functionality and User Reviews

User Experience of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Apps for Depression: An Analysis of App Functionality and User Reviews

Much of this work has focused on the development and evaluation of computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) [5,8-13].

Katarzyna Stawarz, Chris Preist, Debbie Tallon, Nicola Wiles, David Coyle

J Med Internet Res 2018;20(6):e10120

Cost-Utility and Cost-Effectiveness of Internet-Based Treatment for Adults With Depressive Symptoms: Randomized Trial

Cost-Utility and Cost-Effectiveness of Internet-Based Treatment for Adults With Depressive Symptoms: Randomized Trial

To that end, we evaluated cost-utility and cost-effectiveness for 3 contrasts: (1) cognitive behavioral therapy versus placement on a waiting list, (2) problem-solving therapy versus placement on a waiting list, and (3) problem-solving therapy versus cognitive

Lisanne Warmerdam, Filip Smit, Annemieke van Straten, Heleen Riper, Pim Cuijpers

J Med Internet Res 2010;12(5):e53

Use of Mobile and Computer Devices to Support Recovery in People With Serious Mental Illness: Survey Study

Use of Mobile and Computer Devices to Support Recovery in People With Serious Mental Illness: Survey Study

n=50), keep track of time (67%, n=42), access social media (60%, n=38), and track the weather (60%, n=38).Participants rarely used their devices for mental health symptom monitoring (14%, n=9), sleep (14%, n=9), meditation (14%, n=9), dialectical behavior therapy

Valerie A Noel, Stephanie C Acquilano, Elizabeth Carpenter-Song, Robert E Drake

JMIR Ment Health 2019;6(2):e12255

Treatment Preferences for Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Japan: Online Survey

Treatment Preferences for Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Japan: Online Survey

There are two treatment options for individuals who have insomnia: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) [2-4] and pharmacotherapy, including nonbenzodiazepines, benzodiazepines, melatonin agonists, and an orexin receptor antagonist.

Daisuke Sato, Chihiro Sutoh, Yoichi Seki, Eiichi Nagai, Eiji Shimizu

JMIR Form Res 2019;3(2):e12635

Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for College Students With Anxiety, Depression, Social Anxiety, or Insomnia: Four Single-Group Longitudinal Studies of Archival Commercial Data and Replication of Employee User Study

Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for College Students With Anxiety, Depression, Social Anxiety, or Insomnia: Four Single-Group Longitudinal Studies of Archival Commercial Data and Replication of Employee User Study

This context provided an opportunity to test if internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) tools might assist students in self-treating some of the most commonly occurring mental health conditions [16].

Mark D Attridge, Russell C Morfitt, David J Roseborough, Edward R Jones

JMIR Form Res 2020;4(7):e17712

Guided Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Japanese Patients With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

Guided Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Japanese Patients With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

Systemic reviews and meta-analysis show that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the most effective treatment for OCD [3] and is recommended as first-line therapy by the treatment guidelines of The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the

Kazuki Matsumoto, Sayo Hamatani, Takuya Makino, Taku Uemura, Futoshi Suzuki, Seina Shinno, Tomoki Ikai, Hiroyuki Hayashi, Chihiro Sutoh, Eiji Shimizu

JMIR Res Protoc 2020;9(6):e18216

Patient-Centered eHealth Interventions for Children, Adolescents, and Adults With Sickle Cell Disease: Systematic Review

Patient-Centered eHealth Interventions for Children, Adolescents, and Adults With Sickle Cell Disease: Systematic Review

Individuals with SCD are subject to acute and chronic complications, including vaso-occlusive pain crisis, acute chest syndrome, stroke, cognitive dysfunction, and end-organ damage to the liver, spleen, and kidneys, substantially reducing health-related quality

Sherif M Badawy, Robert M Cronin, Jane Hankins, Lori Crosby, Michael DeBaun, Alexis A Thompson, Nirmish Shah

J Med Internet Res 2018;20(7):e10940